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The Universe Today ULTIMATE GUIDE TO VIEWING

 

THE COSMOS

Everything You Need to Know to Become an Amateur Astronomer

 

David Dickinson, Earth science teacher and backyard astronomer, and Fraser Cain, publisher of Universe Today, have teamed up to provide expert guidance on observing the night sky.

The Universe Today Ultimate Guide to Viewing the Cosmos features the best tips and tricks for viewing our solar system and deep sky objects, as well as detailed charts, graphs and tables to find must-see events for years to come. This comprehensive guide is complete with stunning and exclusive photography from top night sky photographers, as well as advice on how to take your own incredible photos.

 

Take your recreational viewing to the next level with activities like:

 

Finding comets and asteroids
Tracking variable stars
Monitoring meteor showers
Following solar activity
Tracking satellites
Timing lunar and asteroid occultations

 

With star charts, practical background information, technological resources and telescope and astrophotography guides, this is the ultimate resource for any backyard space enthusiast.

JOSHUA TREE - SUPER BLUE BLOOD MOON LUNA

Page from The Universe Today Book

SUPER BLUE BLOOD MOON JOSHUA TREE FEBRUA

This was one of the most challenging photos to date. I used two cameras to capture the path of the moon during the total lunar eclipse in January. After spending over two hours trying to find a composition I was satisfied with, I set up my full frame on the tripod. Luminosity masks have become my best friend for bringing out certain highlights in night photos. The foreground consists of a combination of 4 shots to capture details in the areas I wanted to show. I lined up the shot using Photopills and the Sky Guide app to see the exact path the moon would take in the night sky. On my second body, crop sensor, I zoomed in to 120mm and took shots of the various stages of the eclipse throughout the entire night. Basically the entire night was spent running back and forth between both cameras and checking settings. For the final image I simply overlaid the shots taken with my crop sensor since they were zoomed closer and had more detail than the shots with my 14mm wide angle. I knew I wouldn’t be able to capture a balanced exposure of the foreground and the moon in one single photo so I opted for the blended exposure method. The path is true, the size is true and all shots were taken the same night, on the same tripod, at the same exact spot. Watching it in person was pretty awesome.

Nikon D750 | Rokinon 14mm f/ 2.8 | various ISO and shutter speed throughout the night.
Nkon  D5200 | Nikkor 24-120mm f/ 4 | various ISO and shutter speed